diversity, explore food, homegrown, package free, reusable packaging

Being an explorer

So we’re in the shadow of holiday time. For us this winter it’s a road trip up the east coast mixing it up with family, camping, national parks, town visits and naturally for half the family – surfing. (The other half love reading and drawing, so it works well.)

It’s also plastic free July . Normally this isn’t an issue for us, but being on the road may throw the occasional curveball.IMG_1151.jpg

Usually meal planning and a little time in the kitchen gets me over the line. We’ll have our little camp kitchen, but space will be a priority in our van & there’s no refrigeration beyond the ice blocks. So it’ll be basic, but leaves more time for play – everyone wins!

'love to eat homegrown ?'.jpg

Snacking in the garden is one of the bonuses of my market garden gig, unfortunately the garden just isn’t going to fit.  I’ll be checking in with Fair Food Forager  to find local wholefood / co ops/ local fresh food stores when supplies run low & I kinda geek out a bit looking for the super fresh options in a new town. Finding where the happy food is & how locals eat is a way I get my bearings in a new town.

How you you find your way in an unfamiliar area or is a wander around with accidental finds more your speed?

autumn, biodiversity in the garden, diversity, everyday, explore growing, seasonal eating

The more I grow the more I cook (or at least play in the kitchen)

IMG_1186.jpgAnother awesome adventure in abundance !!!

Knowing where to go for your seasonal best is imperative for good health. Better still is learning what on earth to do with it once you’ve got it.

Citrus are care of our backyard – just in time for the vitamin C boost as the seasons shift, cabbage are from a friend who had the patience to watch them grow long enough (think he said 15 weeks) – soon to be turned in to sauerkraut and workshopped, mushroom grow bags are from a recent workshop at a community centre and apples are care of a local farm growing the most incredible fruit (and making cider on site!). – these are just eaten straight, added to porridge & I’ll soon attempt to make vinegar from the apple scraps. Sweet potato were bandicooted from under the fig tree.

So this incredible produce is abundant only at certain times. If you pick 12 kg of limes, it’s a good idea to know how to use them !! In juice, store in the fridge, juice & freeze, freeze the whole fruit, preserve them in salt & trade a few 😉 Time invested in growing throughout the year pays dividends,

So lunch yesterday – sprouted broccoli in  the pan with steamed pumpkin (basically the pumpkin turned itself to soup), fried egg from a friends place, pesto made with parsley, rocket, basil, preserved lime, olive oil & almond meal.  I’d never buy that stuff – but learning to make do with what you’ve got certainly expands your culinary horizons. It’s a bit of being curious, a little brave a fair amount of rational and a whole lot of resourcefulness.

Likewise, letting growers play to their strengths has obvious rewards, the subtleties and knowledge to produce consistently is so under rated.  Once you start on your own growing adventure –  your appreciation of everything considered vaguely edible grows exponentially.

diversity, everyday, spring

Wanting what you’ve got

There always seems to be a push for bigger, brighter, shinier, faster – but only if you tune in to the white noise.

Carving your own path or wandering into the rough can be a little daunting sometimes, but only of you let it. It’s a matter of tuning back in to yourself and who you’d like to be when you grow up. I recently reread this one…

art of frugal hedonismThe Art of Frugal Hedonism – such a joyous read. Made me smile regularly. Not a work about how to chop a whole load of stuff out of your life in order to save, rather refreshingly, it’s more how to make the most of what you’ve got & why the other stuff doesn’t matter nearly as much. The blurry tin was my husband’s nana’s sewing kit, not used by her so often I think – but remarkably has the correct coloured cotton any time I need a tricky to match colour.

Which brings me to why it’s out of the cupboard – learn new old stuff.

Since joining in for a Wild Rumpus visible mending afternoon soiree at a local old school scout hall – everything with even the merest hint of damage is fair game. Wonky stitching is celebrated and becomes a highlight. Try it out in the late afternoon sunshine breathing life back into stuff destined for the back of the wardrobe. When the light has faded from the garden and you still want to be productive at home, it’s rather relaxing, drawing you into the moment. Thought of skills you’ve always wanted to explore ? Pickling is another great self reliance skill to reduce food waste. (Sometimes they even taste better this way – cabbages keep for an eon as sauerkraut and I’ve known fiery radishes to mellow in pickling juice.

Growing self reliance, I’ve even made new friends at work….

frog & sink.JPGGo for a walk, a bike ride, a read, a sit down, a stare into space instead of packing out every moment of the day…..

Instead of trying to fathom what you need to make systems more efficient, try embracing what’s already there. Did you know if you give your place a decent clean, it actually feels different & you don’t need to actually replace/ bring in stuff ? – came as a revelation to me too.

Lie on the grass look up and around and appreciate just how awesome being where we are really is.

Check out your local neighbourhood – you might just find a repair cafe/ tool library/ workshop to tinker….