harvesting the yield, seasonal eating, spring, start from seed

Growing full circle

Seeds are amazing little packets of potential. A handful could grow into a forest. There’s so many you can store in jars in the kitchen for eating later down the track. Heirloom ones that tell a story.

They complete their own magic tricks. Soaked overnight, they double in size – you’ve woken them from hibernation. Soak and rinse, soak and rinse – watch them sprout into edible vegetable tadpoles.

Some seeds you pop into a little growing medium & once they’re just above the ground  – ready to eat. (aka – microgreens) Then there’s other seeds developing into plants that  you can nibble on their tips (like snowpeas), some flowers are edible too (like snowpeas) – but remember – if you eat all the flowers, they won’t complete their cycle by setting fruit. In the the case of snowpeas progressing it’s so worth waiting for a few of the most amazing crunchy delicious garden snacks in the universe (NOTHING can beat the flavour of these little spring gifts – try eating only one….) snowpeas - end Aug 17

So around these parts, we love playing outside. We love to eat our microgreens. And the flowers (never fear – there’s plenty on offer for the insect life).

Just remember to do some homework to see what varieties are good for people. Extend that research to make sure you’re not eating chemically laden ones too.

So may options ! So many textures. So much diversity from a little handful of potential.

produce, seasonal eating, winter

Seasonal offerings

Admittedly – my brain stalled a bit this morning as the rain poured down, saturating my every thought. There’s a special list of jobs I save for days like today – things that don’t seem as much fun when the sun’s out. Couldn’t remember a single one of them or where that list was. So I made it up. Cooking is right up there – thinking a chocolate brownie would be appreciated by all & show that I’d been productive. (Yeah – big tick next to indulgent procrastinating )

Also going for a quick wander through the market garden checking out what’s popping up and what’s happy. Peas – this year I’ve opted for bushing ones, the lower they grow, the less work for me. Super tasty, flowers taste heavenly too. There’s one little tomato plant I’ve left in a protected pocket – still very happy and coming up with the goods – it spraws all over the shop, birds get some, humans get some. I’m afraid if I try to stake it & tidy the tomato plant up now, I may jinx it & no more tomatoes, so for now it can wander to it’s heart’s content.

Salad mix goes year round, each batch is a little different to the previous, as that’s life. Now we’ve got more the the astringent & peppery flavours – mizuna, red veined sorrel, raddichio, rocket to boost digestion …with hints of summer – flowering lemon basil, sweet mint to counter the sharper notes & whispers of springtime with the fresh flavours of chickweed.

The garden and experiemnting keeps me on my toes and I’m keeping my fingers the carrot seeds will actually germinate this time in the cooler weather!

 

 

seasonal eating

Where’s the value ?

It’s a tricky one – grow your own food, whether it’s sprouts on the sink, a few herbs in pots or an array of plants taking over your outdoor space – it all takes a little effort.

Food needs to be shown a little more respect and respect for the people growing it – yourself included ! Shop at a local organic store, food co op or market. As a general rule of thumb, they will be supporting local growers, supporting local and independant businesses. they will be supporting organic growers who focus on nourishing the soil as much as growing tasty, nutritional, seasonal produce.

Sure, I could buy as punnet of red tomatoes for a few bucks, but how awesome finding a plant loving the sunshine offering up little rubies? (FYI – green ones are edible too, just a little tart. They also make an incredible green tomato chutney.) I found self sown dill along the path, chickweed growing crazily and pesto made in the kithcen from basil and parsley to top my vego curry.

Leftovers rock. Batch cook, enjoy that night, keep some lunch in the fridge and stick the rest in the freezer for another day.

Sure I could go out and buy a curry for somewhere between $10 – $15, have it presented to me in single use plastic (which will take approximately another 500 years to break down) OR I could put my super tasty lunch in a glass jar, top it up with fridge and gaarden foraged toppings, wrap it in cloth and sit somewhere amazing in the sunshine getting my vitamin D too. Hey presto – no waste lunch.

Yes it takes a tiny bit of planning, a little bit extra to carry and a quick wash up at home – seems way smaller than ($10 per day x 5 = $50 per week x 40 weeks = $2000 in shop bought lunches !!!)IMG_9135.jpg

So the value is in a little planning ahead, repect for the food you’re eating and really thinking how every element of a shop bought lunch reaches you. Make a party of it and invite your friends. Or just treat yourself to a little lunchtime holiday and explore the neighbourhood.