homegrown, observe, spring

Grounding the preparation

IMG_1559.JPGSun is getting up a little earlier these days, as am I. Easing myself into the upcoming summer routine when the juiciest, most productive part of the day is early morning before the heat gets into things. At the rate our environment is changing, warming up will be commonplace – but I digress.

A little planning goes a long way. Start slow and steady, it will become second nature rather than the sprint to play catch up and get seedlings into the ground. Looking for the changes rather than relying on a calendar and you’ll see spring is barely around the corner. Feed you fruit trees. Feed the garden. Build soil. Get your compost system ticking along happily to generate more of that fabulous nutrient dense soul food for your plants which will in turn make for happy bellies without needing a trip to the local big box for supplies..

Worms are waking up, as are their appetites, feed them up and they’ll pay you in kind. Worm casting are amazing in a home made seed raising mix. Way better to make you own rather than rely on something with hidden ingredients. The one I’m trialing is over here Coir for holding moisture, but not too much, compost – because that’s the good stuff, worm castings for super fine rich and happy nutrient pack and sand for drainage, just in case.

Time to get out there, start some seeds and anticipate playing with your food.

 

diversity, everyday, spring

Wanting what you’ve got

There always seems to be a push for bigger, brighter, shinier, faster – but only if you tune in to the white noise.

Carving your own path or wandering into the rough can be a little daunting sometimes, but only of you let it. It’s a matter of tuning back in to yourself and who you’d like to be when you grow up. I recently reread this one…

art of frugal hedonismThe Art of Frugal Hedonism – such a joyous read. Made me smile regularly. Not a work about how to chop a whole load of stuff out of your life in order to save, rather refreshingly, it’s more how to make the most of what you’ve got & why the other stuff doesn’t matter nearly as much. The blurry tin was my husband’s nana’s sewing kit, not used by her so often I think – but remarkably has the correct coloured cotton any time I need a tricky to match colour.

Which brings me to why it’s out of the cupboard – learn new old stuff.

Since joining in for a Wild Rumpus visible mending afternoon soiree at a local old school scout hall – everything with even the merest hint of damage is fair game. Wonky stitching is celebrated and becomes a highlight. Try it out in the late afternoon sunshine breathing life back into stuff destined for the back of the wardrobe. When the light has faded from the garden and you still want to be productive at home, it’s rather relaxing, drawing you into the moment. Thought of skills you’ve always wanted to explore ? Pickling is another great self reliance skill to reduce food waste. (Sometimes they even taste better this way – cabbages keep for an eon as sauerkraut and I’ve known fiery radishes to mellow in pickling juice.

Growing self reliance, I’ve even made new friends at work….

frog & sink.JPGGo for a walk, a bike ride, a read, a sit down, a stare into space instead of packing out every moment of the day…..

Instead of trying to fathom what you need to make systems more efficient, try embracing what’s already there. Did you know if you give your place a decent clean, it actually feels different & you don’t need to actually replace/ bring in stuff ? – came as a revelation to me too.

Lie on the grass look up and around and appreciate just how awesome being where we are really is.

Check out your local neighbourhood – you might just find a repair cafe/ tool library/ workshop to tinker….

spring, start a garden, Uncategorized

Emergence

Spring has just made itself feel blatantly apparent – by having summer jump up today. You never know exactly what you’re in for during spring. So far we’ve had wind, sunshine, days of eternal optimism, moments of wondering how it all fits together and many many occasions of feeling so incredibly lucky to be right here right now.

Plenty of workshops on the grow…

Loads of lovely feedback from people just wanting to get the basics on how to get started on the edible garden adventure. We’re doing plenty of trials ourselves – seeing what works direct sown and what we can start indoors. Patience is key and a skill to be learnt !

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Thank you Kelly for this gorgeous shot – I’d like to think this is how gardening always is, there’s certainly a whole lot of just getting stuck in.

Look after your soil and it will look after you. Don’t forget to stay hydrated and the garden too – very tricky to grow with out water!

community, observe, spring

Makes me smile

It’s all the little things.

These are in no particular order…..

When someone doing great work is happy to share their experiences with you (thanks to super mentor market gardeners Cal at Green Connect & Lizzie of Piccolo Farm ), when you go into a volunteer in a school garden with a loose plan – you end up with 48 students instead of the regular 24 and everyone has a great time – including the volunteer. (Also stoked with our newly arrived veg garden mascot – miraculously ‘appreared’ one day)

When your remarkable partner helps solve your irrigation issues because he understands you can’t be good at all the stuff all the time and brings home a second hand tank still smiling himself after a very long day, ’cause he knows how important it is to you. (And hooks it up the following day)

It makes me smile when you receive an email showing interest in your enterprise, to find out someone you admire in business has recommended you. (Thank you Ciara at Earthwalker & Co !)

Having enough time and space to share around with the neighbours. (working out where our neighbour will plant chillis and corn this summer)

Being curious enough and brave enough to ask people questions and their opinions when you don’t have the answers yourself.

Variety outside. Being outside. And being barefoot outside. Simple and effective.

Seeing kids impressed and fascinated by checking out the school garden compost worms without squealing.

Having so many ideas you don’t know which way to look, so you just start and it starts working out.

The generosity of people, wanting to be involved and offering their time. (Spring into Action volutneers – you all rock !)

 

So much goodness – it’s all that interconnectedness, collaboration not competition, that keeps our world spinning. Enjoy.

harvesting the yield, seasonal eating, spring, start from seed

Growing full circle

Seeds are amazing little packets of potential. A handful could grow into a forest. There’s so many you can store in jars in the kitchen for eating later down the track. Heirloom ones that tell a story.

They complete their own magic tricks. Soaked overnight, they double in size – you’ve woken them from hibernation. Soak and rinse, soak and rinse – watch them sprout into edible vegetable tadpoles.

Some seeds you pop into a little growing medium & once they’re just above the ground  – ready to eat. (aka – microgreens) Then there’s other seeds developing into plants that  you can nibble on their tips (like snowpeas), some flowers are edible too (like snowpeas) – but remember – if you eat all the flowers, they won’t complete their cycle by setting fruit. In the the case of snowpeas progressing it’s so worth waiting for a few of the most amazing crunchy delicious garden snacks in the universe (NOTHING can beat the flavour of these little spring gifts – try eating only one….) snowpeas - end Aug 17

So around these parts, we love playing outside. We love to eat our microgreens. And the flowers (never fear – there’s plenty on offer for the insect life).

Just remember to do some homework to see what varieties are good for people. Extend that research to make sure you’re not eating chemically laden ones too.

So may options ! So many textures. So much diversity from a little handful of potential.